Tag Archives: Sony

Episode 117 – Wu-Tang: Shaolin Style (1999) and Thrill Kill (1998)

Episode 117 – Wu-Tang: Shaolin Style (1999) and Thrill Kill (1998)

Episode 117 – Wu-Tang: Shaolin Style (1999) and Thrill Kill (1998)

This week in Your Parents Basement, we are the RZA, the GZA, ODB, Inspectah Deck… From 1999, we’re playing Wu-Tang: Shaolin Style by Paradox Development for the Sony Playstation. We’re also playing the canceled game its based on, Thrill Kill, from 1998.

You can manually download this week’s gore-tastic podcast here or subscribe to the show via the iTunes store. To manually subscribe, use this link in the device / podcast player of choice. You can also follow us on Twitter, or ‘like’ us on Facebook.

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TIMESTAMPS

  • 0:00 – Intro, which features the title theme from this week’s game. WU WORLD ORDER!
  • 27:30 – It’s… The Most Worst Game of All-Time! Which is then followed by, The Most Best Game of All-Time.
  • 36:00 – Emails! We hear from the staarrrrr of a famous movie superhero series’ brother.
  • 51:30 – Ask the Sweet Boys. We REALLY help out some people! Red Lobster vs. Hooters.
  • 58:30 – Snifferoo. Man, the 1990s were full of techno…

SHOW NOTES

– According to Price Charting, Wu-Tang: Shaolin Style is surprisingly valuable! It’s about $20 for the disc and manual. Thrill Kill isn’t available for purchase, but plenty of places have it for download on the Internets.

– Bill Murray and the Wu-Tang Clan are cool with each other. Read that and other Bill Murray fun facts here.

Vidya Game News – November 17, 2016

wwf-no-mercy-n64-01– Polygon has released their massive video game gift guide, which is neat to read just to catch up on all of the cool stuff you didn’t even know existed.

– The new Daytona USA game, confusingly called Daytona 3 Championship USA, has some trailers out now.

– To hype the (incredibly hard to get) NES Classic, Nintendo has interviews with the developers of Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 3 here. And hey, check out our episodes for the first and second games of that series!

– In a fun feature, Polygon’s Owen S. Good tallies up how much it would cost to just buy an NES and all of the games on the NES Classic, instead of paying the prices online for it.

– From Motherboard and other sites, a guy is shooting for 2017 for the release of Tanglewood, a new Genesis game programmed on an authentic development kit.

ON THIS DAY (OR CLOSE TO IT!) IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– Mentioned prominently in last week’s show was WWF No Mercy, which was released on this day in 2000 by Asmik Ace and AKI. It’s still considered to be one of the gold standards for wrasslin’ video games.

The ole Xbox was released on Nov. 15, 2001. That old chestnut didn’t sell well in Japan, and ultimately came out behind the PS2 in America, but it established a firm beachhead in console sales for Microsoft.

– Three days after the Xbox came the Gamecube. Again, it finished behind the PS2 in the sixth generation console wars, but it had some very well-received games, like…

– The Metroid series is kind of a big deal in November. In 2002, both Metroid Prime and Metroid Fusion had concurrent releases for the Gamecube and GBA. The sequel to Prime came out on Nov. 15, 2004. (And hey, check out our episode on Super Metroid here!)

– On November 16, 2004, Valve released Half-Life 2. The incredible FPS was followed by sequels, Episode One and Episode Two, and then NOTHING. The third installment will never come out because Valve clearly hates us now.

Dragon Quest VIII, the first of the series to drop the “Dragon Warrior” name for an American release, came out for the PS2 on Nov. 15, 2005. It was a solid effort, although not as long and deep as previous efforts from Enix.

– In 2006, the PlayStation 3 came out. It was a swell system, but it ceded the control of the market that the PS2 and PSX had established because of a high initial price and lack of third party support. (And by the way, the PS4 came out on Nov. 15, 2013, so Sony likes to push them consoles out in the holiday season.)

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – October 28, 2016

The PS2.– Kyle Orland has a good interview with Sid Meier, of Civilization fame, for Ars Technica. You can read it here! And check out our Civilization show here.

– Speaking of Orland, he had a cool link in his weekly newsletter to an older piece about how insider leaks happen. (If you’re not subscribing to Orland’s weekly newsletter yet, you should! That is, if you love vidya games.)

– On Engadget and other sites: A prototype for a SNES version of Rayman has been found.

– In honor of Halloween, Justin Carreiro of The Young Folks has a look at Maniac Mansion. You can listen to our show on it here! Also, Ryan Gibbs of The Young Folks once talked SimCity with us here.

Pokemon Sun and Moon, which release Nov. 18 for the 3DS, are Nintendo’s biggest pre-ordered games of all-time, per a release by the company published on Polygon.

– Nathan Grayson of Kotaku summarizes some of the issues hitting up mod support for Sega games on Steam here.

– The USgamer team ranks all 30 games in the NES Classic here! Games we’ve covered on YPB: Bubble Bobble, Castlevania, Punch-Out, Tecmo Bowl, Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 2.

– On Polygon and other sites this week… The official Sega employee song from the 1990s.

ON THIS DAY (OR CLOSE TO IT!) IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– The PlayStation 2 came out on October 26, 2000. It was pretty popular.

– In 2002, a little game called Grand Theft Auto: Vice City came out. It was pretty, pretty, pretty popular. Almost exactly two years later, Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas came out, and it was also pretty, pretty, pretty popular.

– Another lil game, Fallout 3, came out on October 28, 2008. Again, it was pretty popular.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – September 29, 2016

nintendo-64-system-shot

Happy birthday, Nintendo 64!

– GamesIndustry.biz has an awesome, long interview with Rand Miller of Cyan Worlds on Myst, Obduction and releasing a game without a strong publisher. You can read it here, and listen to our show on Myst here!

– Brian Shea at Game Informer has a good piece on how Sega and Nintendo finally made peace over the years, and how Sonic appeared on a Nintendo platform. You can read it here.

– The spiritual successor to River City Ransom, River City: Toyko Rumble, has scooped up a good review from GameSpot. Listen to our show on the original game here.

– The early reviews on Sonic Mania are good so far.

– From The Daily Dot and other sites, the Warcraft movie now has an Honest Trailer out for it. Listen to our review of the game series here!

– PCMag.com has a slideshow on seven Mario games that never made it to the U.S.

ON THIS DAY (OR CLOSE TO IT!) IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– The Nintendo 64 came out for everyone today in 1996. It was kind of a big deal. Past N64 games we’ve covered: Quest 64, Superman 64, Mario Kart 64, Goldeneye and Star Fox 64.

– By the way, it seems weird, but Pokemon Red and Blue came out in Sept. 28, 1998 – two years AFTER the Nintendo 64 was released.

– A little game called Fallout came out for the PC on Sept. 30, 1997. Amazing, a sequel came out only a year later. Both games had more in common with the X-Com series than the action-RPG Fallout has become, but they were very well-reviewed.

Tales of Destiny, the second game in that popular series, came out on Sept. 30, 1998 for the PlayStation. In this game from Namco and Wolf Team, you play as Stahn and kill things with a big sword. It’s a weird kind of RPG-action game, but well-reviewed and well-received.

Crash Team Racing, a completely and utterly original kart racing game, came out on Sept. 30, 1999. For more on Crash Bandicoot, check out our episode from a few weeks ago. And if you’d prefer our thoughts on some other racing game, try this episode.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

 

Vidya Game News – September 8, 2016

paraside-eve-psx-box-art– So! Nintendo, as usual, has been aggressive pursuing fan games using their characters, with the latest target being a mash-up of Mario and No Man’s Sky. Those developers responded by turning it into DCMA’s Sky. You can read more on Polygon here.

– From The Dreamcast Junkyard, a great series of articles on their hunt to find a legendary barber from some commercials.

– The Couch Potato over at New Castle News has a fine personal essay on his experiences with Super Mario Bros. 3, the Super Nintendo and other gaming stuff. Read it here.

– Reddit and YouTube deliver this week with Midway’s pitch video to the NBA for a little game called NBA Jam. You can check out the video here, and listen to our episode on Jam here!

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– A little deep, story-driven game known as Final Fantasy VII came out for the PlayStation on September 7, 1997. The indie darling sold a ton of copies, and it’s wildly recognized for popularizing RPGs outside of Japan. (And by the way, the PlayStation itself came out on September 9, 1995.)

Parasite Eve, an oft-mentioned favorite of Steve, came out September 9, 1998. It was an odd action RPG with guns that spawned an incredibly underrated sequel, and an iffy PSP game with a completely indecipherable plot.

– Also from 1998: Spyro the Dragon! The little purple dragon started doing like, dragon stuff, on Sept. 10. By Insomniac Games, it was pretty popular with a wide range of gamers, including more casual folks.

– 9/9/99 for $199! The Sega Dreamcast came out on Sept. 9, 1999. God, it was such an awesome little system, but Sega eventually lost its stomach for the console business. It had a strong start that it ceded as hype for the PlayStation 2 ramped up.

Ready 2 Rumble Boxing by Midway came out in 1999 for the Dreamcast, and then later for the N64, PSX and Gameboy Color. The colorful boxing came made people more nostalgic for better boxing games, but it sold well.

– Also for the Dreamcast in 1999: Soulcalibur! The fighter from Namco featured a heavy emphasis on weapons, and it was highly rated at the time and in ensuing years as the series continued.

Final Fantasy Tactics Advance bastardized a great PSX game, but, well, it came out this day in 2003 for the Gameboy Adance. Some people like it. Those people are wrong.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Episode 071 – Crash Bandicoot (1996)

Episode 071 – Crash Bandicoot (1996)

Episode 071 – Crash Bandicoot (1996)

This week in Your Parents Basement, we are staring at the ass of a marsupial! From 1996, we’re playing Crash Bandicoot by Naughty Dog for the Playstation.

You can manually download this week’s blocky pixels podcast here or subscribe to the show via the iTunes store. To manually subscribe, use this link in the device / podcast player of choice. You can also follow us on Twitter, or ‘like’ us on Facebook.

As always, if you like the show, support us by buying from Amazon! You can use this link to go to Amazon, and any purchase you make will kick a couple bucks to the show, with no extra cost to you. It’s a win-win!

Want to have an email or comment read on the air? Send us a message on the ole Twitter or Facebook, or, shoot that mail to parentsbasementpodcast@gmail.com.

TIMESTAMPS

  • 0:00 – Intro, which features the Down Undah theme from the game.
  • 33:30 – Emails! Why can’t we be “fun” and “goofy” like the Nerdist boys?
  • 43:00 – We have two Asks in Ask the Sweet Boys.
  • 49:30 – We are training like hell for next week’s game!

SHOW NOTES

– According to Price Charting, the original Crash games have held their value well. The first one goes for $25 for just the game, and $32 if you have the manual. Almost all of the games are at least $12 if you have the manual and box.

– The world of Crash erotica is very disturbing, so click this link with caution. The same warning goes if you run any character from Crash in Google Images.

– Kotaku has covered the Crash Bandicoot remaster, here!

Vidya Game News – July 21, 2016

Shinobi III - Genesis - Box Art– Gizmodo has an awesome write-up of the find of a Seattle man: The incredibly rare Nintendo 64 disk drive.

– Of all places, Playboy has a long read on how the really good 2009 Ghostbusters game came together. You can read it here, although your work’s spam filter might block. And hey, listen to our show on the NES Ghostbusters here!

– Engadget has a good summary article of Ben Heck ripping into the “newly” discovered Nintendo-Sony CD unit.

– There is now a Kickstarter for the old NES Wisdom Tree games, which were pretty horrible games based on Bible stories. But still, if you want to support it, go here.

– Now in Japan! Kirby restaurants. (And check out our Kirby show.)

– From The Daily Mail, games like Mario Kart might make you a better driver, according to a study. (Check out our episode here!)

– Gizmodo’s Adam Clark Estes has a review of the Analogue NT, a souped-up clone of the NES. It’s basically like a great version of the NES Classic going on sale this November. And, oh, it costs $500.

– From Mashable and Reddit, Matt Damon might be interested in doing some video game stuff.

– Posted on a bunch of sites, including the developer site: Obduction, a spiritual successor to Myst, has been delayed from July 26 to the week of Aug. 22.

– Looking to move out of your parents basement? Booooo! But if you are, then don’t go to Worcester. Your parents’ basement is good enough for Jeff Teague, so it should be good enough for you.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– A pair of classic Genesis games, Shinobi III and Road Rash 2, came out in 1993.

– On July 22, 2008, a remake of Final Fantasy IV came out for the DS. It was… really bizarre. Developed by Matrix Software, it was in 3D and had an augment system that allowed you to power up characters after they left your party. The difficulty was also ramped up, and some story segments were added back in.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – July 7, 2016

Gran Turismo 3 - PS2 - Box Art– Polygon has an awesome full-length feature on where Blizzard’s Starcraft: Ghost went wrong.

– Also from Polygon, a good, long read by Colin Campbell on an Atari artwork book.

– A translation for Wizardry Gaiden IV has been released, according to the folks at ROMhacking.net. Check out this “new” SNES game here!

– Hadlee Simons at Gearburn has a look at five failed handheld systems.

– From various websites, Stephen Colbert attempts to eat a Hot Pocket quicker than a guy completes Super Mario Bros. 3. Video here!

– As expected, Nintendo shut down a Kickstarter project for an NES coffee table book.

– The latest video on Cracked from Cody Johnston is about how Christopher Nolan stole his ideas from DuckTales. No word yet from Todd how this infraction ranks on the DuckTales scale.

– From TechTimes, Paul Rudd has barely aged since starring in SNES commercials back in the day.

– Also on TechTimes, Chinese companies are constantly making bootleg games with all the Nintendo characters.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– On July 10, 2001, Gran Turismo 3: A-Spec came out for the Playstation 2. The effort from Polyphony Digital set a new standard for realistic racing games. The sixth installment came out in December 2013 to glowing reviews for the PS3, and Gran Turismo Sport is due out in November as a PS4 exclusive.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – June 30, 2016

Image from MobyGames.

Image from MobyGames.

– The Nintendo 64 turned 20 last week, which led to retrospectives from plenty of places, like Nerdist and Tech Insider.

– The fine folks at Shmuplations are dong the lord’s work, as they’ve unearthed an old interview from developers on Super Mario Kart. You can read it here.

– The new Toejam and Earl game has gotten more funding, and it’ll see a console release! Read more about it in a piece by Brandon Orselli from Niche Gamer. And, check out our episode on the original!

– RZA will be doing some music inspired by old Atari games, which actually sounds kind of cool. Read more on Billboard here.

– Good news, everyone! Adventures of Mana, a 3D remake of the old Game Boy game Final Fantasy Adventure, is now out for the Vita. Read the release from Sony here. It’s the first game in the Secret of Mana series, which we covered in the past.

– From MCV, via Famitsu, the new Harvest Moon game for the 3DS is #1 on the Japanese sales chart. It’s scheduled to come out in America at some point in 2017.

– It’s short notice, but Nintendo is hosting a festival in Montreal this weekend! For more details, go here. And if you’d like to head Down Undah, there is an 8-bit festival in Melbourne later in July, according to Time Out Melbourne.

– Yougurtland is partnering with Nintendo.

– A Final Fantasy VII version of Monopoly is coming out in April 2017. It’s by Merchoid, and you can read more on Examiner.com here.

– A Kickstarter campaign has been launched for a “complete remake” of System Shock. Read more on the project page here.

– The producer of the Tetris movie now claims it’ll be a three-movie series! Yikes. Read more on Empire.

– The Angry Video Game Nerd re-visits Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles for the NES, 10 years after he first covered it. Check out the video here. For James and Mike Mondays, they played Alex Kidd in Miracle World.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

Star Fox 64 came out this day in 1997. And hey, we reviewed it! Check out our show here.

– On June 29 in 2000, Icewind Dale by Black Isle Studios was released by Interplay. It was a well-reviewed game based on Dungeons and Dragons.

– In 1996, Bruce Jenner’s World Class Decathlon came out for the PC. It was 20 years ago Jenner won a gold medal in the decathlon, so, that was kind of weird.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – March 24, 2016

Legend of Zelda - The Wind Waker– Kyle Orland of Ars Technica has a good piece on why developers need to embrace emulation to preserve gaming history.

– Mike Fahey of Kotaku has a good read on how a planned Superman game instead sunk a game studio, Factor 5, the one behind Rogue Squadron.

– Steve Tilley of The Toronto Sun has a look at Batman games vs. Superman games, with the movie soon to come out. He comes to roughly the same conclusion that YPB did, in that Batman games are way better.

– Looking to signify to everyone who visits your home that you’re a massive geek? Check out this nifty Retro NES Shower Curtain!

– Atari has revealed the list of games in its upcoming Atari Vault collection. The 100 games can be seen here, on IGN.com.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– In 2003, Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker came out for the Gamecube. It got universally great reviews, although some did gripe about the sailing aspects.

The Playstation Portable came out in 2005. Amazingly, it was technically supported by Sony until being discontinued in 2014, and sold 82 million units worldwide. While it’s maligned because of its weird game format and somewhat flimsy nature, there are some good re-releases of the Persona and Final Fantasy series available for it.

– Speaking of the PSP… Crisis Core, an action-RPG prequel to Final Fantasy VII, came out for the system in 2008. It was actually a pretty solid game! Unfortunately, it did further complicate the timeline for the original game, which is now a mess.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.