Tag Archives: Castlevania

Vidya Game News – February 9, 2017

castlevania-3-box-art-01– Netflix has confirmed that an animated Castlevania show will be hitting their service in 2017! You can read about it on GameSpot, and a bunch of other sites. Its creator has called it “R-rated as fuck,” and based on Castlevania 3. You can listen to our ‘vania 1 show here.

– Enshrined in Stuff’s Hall of Fame now: The Sega Mega Drive. Read more here!

– From Tristan Jurkovich at GameSpew, a good read on the “bizarre localization” of a fun adventure / platform action game, Power Blade.

– Sweet sassy molassy! Source codes for NBA Jam Extreme and Turok: The Dinosaur Hunter were found on some auctioned computers, according to this Kotaku article, which is based on the fine work of the folks at YouTube channel Silicon Classics.

– On Ars Technica, World of Warcraft gold can now be used on other Blizzard titles like Overwatch and Hearthstone. Also, by the way, we’ve covered a bunch of their games – the original Warcraft series, Starcraft and Diablo.

– A slew of Star Wars games are available in this week’s Humble Bundle, including Knights of the Old Republic and Shadows of the Empire. Check it out here! We haven’t covered those excellent games, but we have played and reviewed Rogue Squadron 3D (included in the bundle!) and Super Star Wars (not including, but you don’t wanna murder jawas anyway).

As always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – December 8, 2016

mario-paint-tmnt– Huge news for Todd Brisket, as the new DuckTales is on the schedule for a Summer 2017 release! Read more at Entertainment Weekly, and listen to our show on the vidya game here!

– Cinemassacre (the site of the Angry Video Game Nerd) had a viral video this week, as Mike Matei recreated the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles theme in Mario Paint. Check out the cool video here!

– Russ Frushtick and Justin McElroy of Polygon have a cool video on the tangled history and development of Super Mario Bros. 2. We also covered SMB2 on a past show, by the way.

– On Polygon and other sites, Crash Bandicoot is coming back in remastered form, for the PS4! Check out our past show on ole Crash here.

– Unfortunately, Konami has sent a cease-and-desist to Dejawolfs, which was developing a remake of Castlevania in the Unreal engine. You can read the story on Siliconera here. And reminder! We covered Castlevania on a past show.

– From Variety, Sega has optioned a bunch of its titles for film and television adaptations, starting with Altered Beast and Streets of Rage. And speaking of Sega selling off its merchandising rights, it has also partnered with Build-A-Bear.

Nintendo Everything has a translation of a Japanese book about The Legend of Zelda series, which reveals that a sequel to Wind Waker was canned for Twilight Princess.

– Geeks of Doom has a positive review of Art of Atari, a cool book full of Atari art.

ON THIS DAY (OR CLOSE TO IT!) IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– On December 9, 1997, Quake II came out for the PC. It was the online standard for a couple years of deathmatching, until Unreal Tournament and eventually Half-Life came out.

Persona 4 came out for the PS2 on December 9, 2008. It’s a hella good RPG by Atlus, and the fifth installment is due out on April 4, if it’s not delayed again.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – September 15, 2016

animal-crossing-gcn-box-art– Aaron Couch of The Hollywood Reporter has a good, long interview with Darkwing Duck creator Tad Stones, which you can read here. Among the revelations? The show wasn’t a spin-off of DuckTales, as instead, it took place in an alternate dimension. And by the way, check out our DuckTales episode here.

– The AV Club’s William Hughes spoke to Myst creator Rand Miller on his favorite puzzles, and how that game almost became a Disney ride. Read it here! And listen to our Myst episode here!

– In a good interview with MCV’s Alex Calvin, Sega’s European boss Jurgen Post admits that the company was pushing out too much crap during the Wii-era.

– From Polygon and other sites, Blizzard’s Chris Metzen is retiring. He was serving as the senior vice president of story and franchise development, and joined the company in the early 1990s as an illustrator and animator. He was responsible for expanding the lore of Warcraft, Diablo and StarCraft.

­– And speaking of Blizzard… One of its low lights, the cancelled Warcraft Adventures, has made its way to the Internet. Check out our show on the actual Warcraft series here.

– Did You Know Gaming covers Super Mario World this week, via Nerdist.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

Animal Crossing came out today in 2002 in North America. It was yet another blockbuster series established by Nintendo.

Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance was released on Sept. 16, 2002 for the Gameboy Advance. It was fun! It mixed the classic gameplay with RPG elements.

– A Dragon Quest IV remake, Chapters of the Chosen, came out on Sept. 16, 2008. It took the gameplay of the original, but included manual control for the later chapters (yay!), but also gave everyone weird accents (boo!). New this week is a remake of Dragon Quest VII for the 3DS, which turns it into a much better, playable game, per Attack of the Geek’s Dean James.

FTL: Faster Than Light came out on Sept. 14, 2012. No, it’s not a classic game, but it’s hella good! You definitely need to play it if you like games.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – June 9, 2016

Circle of the Moon - GBA - Box Art– A fun piece from Dany Roth of blastr, as he looks at 10 forgotten NES games that deserve a comeback. Included on the list is The Guardian Legend, which we covered a few weeks ago.

– Joe Juba of Game Informer spoke with Takashi Tokita, one of the directors of classic RPG Chrono Trigger. He’d like to see a “high quality, high end” version of the game. As a comment on the article summed up perfectly: *breathing intensifies*

Obduction, a spiritual successor to Myst by Cyan, is scheduled for a July release according to Elise Favis of Game Informer. (And hey, listen to our Myst episode!)

– Director Rocky Morton tells Poppy-Jay Palmer of SciFiNow about the horrible experience he had directing the Super Mario Bros. movie.

– Anthony John Agnello looks at the development of story in the Metroid series for the AV Club. (And hey, check out our Super Metroid episode!)

– Jeremy Peel of the PC Games Network has an interview with the current management of Atari.

– Nolan Moore is trying to hack a Power Glove to control robots, drones and other things, which is awesome. Read more about his project here.

– The latest Mike and Bootsy game on Cinemassacre is Swamp Thing for the NES. Check out their video here!

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– Hey, the Game Boy Advance came out on June 11, 2001! It ended up selling more than 81 million units, which is pretty, pretty, pretty good. Castlevania: Circle of the Moon was a launch title. It’s a stellar side-scroller with RPG elements, and worth hunting down.

– Also on June 11, but in 2000, The Legend of Dragoon came out for the Playstation. It was a fairly mediocre RPG, but one of the first released for the system, so it sold fairly well as a result.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – May 5, 2016

Kirby as Sonic - 01– Of all the things Sega could license… A movie adaption of Shinobi could be coming soon, per Variety. It’s a solid game, but when it comes to story-based ninja games, it’s no Ninja Gaiden.

– Also, Sega has allowed modding to its games on Steam. As you can imagine, this has led to all sorts of fun, like Kirby starring in Sonic The Hedgehog and difficulty hacks for Comix Zone. Zack Kotzer of Motherboard has a good summary article on some changes.

– From Carl Batchelor of Niche Gamer, NES dungeon crawl game Shadow Brain has gotten a translation patch.

– Ryan Shoptaw of Gaming Conviction says a prototype cart for DuckTales 2 is now for sale.

– Nolan Bushnell, the original vidya games guy for Atari, is now working on cell phone games.

– Over on Cinemassacre, Mike and Bootsy play the NES hack Luigi’s Chronicles 2, an ultra-tough remake of Super Mario Bros. 3.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– In 1992, Wolfenstein 3D was released for the PC by id Software. You play as William “B.J.” Blazkowicz and shoot down a ton of Nazis, and it was as awesome as it sounded at the time. It was the FPS game that popularized the genre.

– On May 6, 2001, Mario Party 3 came out for the N64. Yes, there were three Mario Party games for the 64! It was also the last Mario game for the system.

– Konami released Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow in 2003 for the Gameboy Advance. It is one of the excellent Metroidvania games in the series. (And hey, check out our episodes on Castlevania and Super Metroid!)

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – March 31, 2016

Socks The Cat Rocks the Hill - SNES - 01Yearly reminder: Friday is April 1, so any of these stories have a chance of being false in the future, unfortunately.

– From a site called MEL, Sam Stecklow has a great read on Socks the Cat Rocks the Hill, a cancelled video game for the SNES and Genesis based on the Clintons’ cat… OR IS IT CANCELLED?!?! There might be a Kickstarter campaign to get it properly released.

– Sam Machkovech of Ars Technica has a long write-up of some of the cooler panel talks at the Game Developers Conference. Among the revelations: Ms. Pac-Man began as a speed-up kit, and Diablo was originally going to be a turn-based game.

– Atlas Obscura has a good, long read from Eric Gundhauser on the non-rise and quick fall of the Phillips CD-i.

– Speaking of failed systems… Deuce of WRRV 92.7 and 96.9 links to a 30-minute Atari Jaguar informercial, which is crazy go nuts.

– And speaking of Atari, Joey Morona of Cleveland.com has a slideshow of their ads.

– Seth G. Macy at IGN has a neat piece on some trivia about classic NES games. Covered are The Legend of Zelda, Castlevania, Mario, Mega Man, Metroid and the Konami Code.

– In current events news, Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice has done about $193 million at the domestic box office, and $501 million worldwide, according to Box Office Mojo. This means we’ll probably get more of them, despite the 29 percent rating from Rotten Tomatoes. Yaaaay… Esquire’s Tyler Coates has a piece that is titled perfectly: “How did Batman go from being fun and gay to sad and boring?

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– Depending on the platform, Lego Star Wars came out this week in 2005. It was the first of many Lego games by TT Games, and almost all of them have been well-reviewed. They’re perfect for your sweet baby boys and girls at home to get into!

– Although the SNES rightly gets a lot of credit for popularizing the RPG genre, the PSX probably remains the platform that just had the most “what the hell?” RPGs, and a surprising amount made it to the U.S. Such as… Rhapsody: A Musical Adventure, from Nippon Ichi, the makers of the Disgaea series. It’s the same sort of tactical, turn-based RPG game as later Nippon Ichi titles, but it came out in 1998, four years before La Pucelle: Tactics and five years before Disgaea.

StarCraft came out for the PC in 1998. For way more on that game, check out our episode from November!

– In 1997, Doom 64 came out for, you guessed it, the Nintendo 64. While it didn’t get much attention, it is Steve’s favorite version of Doom because it adds some weapons and looks a bit nicer than some of the older PC versions.

– And oh yeah, Resident Evil came out in 1996. I guess it’s kind of a big deal, too.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – March 17, 2016

Castlevania Bloodlines - Ad Copy - SHRINK– Hey, the NCAA tournament starts today! While there was a lot of fanfare when the college football series by EA ended, the NCAA Basketball series went with a whimper in 2010. It kind of sucked, since the 2K series was better, but even that ended in 2008. Amusingly, even though it’s not a great game, NCAA Basketball 10 now goes for more than $30 because it’s the last one. (NCAA Football 14 is in the same boat, with prices staying at $25+, although that’s a much better game.)

– Matt Peckham of Time.com, which apparently used to be a magazine, has an interview with Miyamoto on Star Fox Zero.

I Am Setsuna is the latest new RPG series from Square Enix, and according to IGN, it’s inspired by Chrono Trigger. Nice!

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– We’re finally getting to some decent historical release dates! On this day in 1994, Castlevania: Bloodlines came out for the Genesis. It was the only ’Vania game released for the Genesis, and it was very well-received. (The photo comes from this website.)

– Also for the Genesis in 1994, there was Streets of Rage 3! It was more of the same – basically, that system’s answer to Final Fight – but still good.

Legend of Legaia, a perfectly average PSX RPG, came out in 1998. From the developer Contrail, it had a sequel in 2001, but otherwise, it hasn’t been prominent.

– Last year, Final Fantasy Type-0 HD came out for the PS4 and Xbox One. It was based on an old Playstation Portable game, and it shows with the weird, frenetic gameplay. Steve just bought it last week for $10 and says it’s pretty passable.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Episode 026 – Castlevania (1987)

Episode 026 – Castlevania (1987)

Episode 026 – Castlevania (1987)

It’s the spoooookiest episode yet for our sweet baby boys, as this week in Your Parents Basement, the game is Castlevania from 1987! Not surprisingly, it’s very tough, but very fun.

You can manually download this week’s podcast here – whip it good – or subscribe to the show via the iTunes store. To manually subscribe, use this link in the device / podcast player of choice. You can also follow us on Twitter, or ‘like’ us on Facebook.

As always, if you like the show, support us by buying from Amazon! You can use this link to go to Amazon, and any purchase you make will kick a couple bucks to the show, with no extra cost to you. It’s a win-win! Want to have an email or comment read on the air? Send us a message on the ole Twitter or Facebook, or, shoot that mail to parentsbasementpodcast@gmail.com.

TIMESTAMPS

  • 0:00 – Intro, which is The Miinibosses covering the main theme from ‘Vania. Their website is here, and they do a bunch of covers of old vidya game music.
  • 43:15 – Emails. The boys talk about good games for kids, and more inappropriate things.
  • 56:30 – Snifferoo. We are playing the absolute best licensed game of all-time, possibly, next week.

SHOW NOTES

– According to Price Charting, the original Castlevania has held its value very well. The loose cart goes for $21, which is high for a NES game. “Complete” sales (box and manual) average $76, and sealed new boxes range from $250 to $2,000, depending on when they go on sale. It is available on the Wii’s eShop. Symphony of the Night is on Sony’s online store. The other games in the range between $8 and $50 for the cart, up to several hundred for new copies.

– Various games of the Castlevania series have been fodder for the Angry Video Game Nerd, most famously, the second game. (Note: Very NSFW language.) He and his buddy Mike also played the Sega Genesis remake of the first game, Bloodlines. Also, past show subject Arino of Game Center CX played Castlevania 3.

– There are several Castlevania speedruns, but this one beats it in a little over 11 minutes.

– When it comes to the history of development in the Castlevania series, IGN has a good retrospective from February 2014 here. When it comes to the in-game canon history, the Castlevania Wiki is your best bet. Warning: It’s very tangled, as we mention on the show.

Vidya Game News – July 16, 2015

William Shatner's TekWar - Box Art

Now this looks PRETTY legit.

It’s way too friggin’ humid in New England, but despite the condensation, we’ve prepared only the best news for you to enjoy today! Here are some of the stories about classic games and series we’ve culled from around the Interwebs:

– In last week’s “Four of a Kind” feature on Purple Revolver by James Brookfield, they cover bad celebrity endorsed games. The finalists? Shaq Fu, Chuck Norris Superkicks, Michael Jordan: Chaos in the Windy City, and William Shatner’s TekWar, which apparently exists!

– Looking for some classic game recommendations? Nicholas Bitonti of The Detroit Metro Times has some good recommendations. While I don’t agree with all of them, they’re more obscure and interesting than the usual ones you see floating around the web, and cover a variety of systems.

– For the upcoming release of Pixels, Chauncey Alcorn of The New York Daily News has a ranking of his favorite 10 arcade games of all-time. Spoiler alert: Tekken 4 is way too friggin’ high, and while it’s nice to see Virtua Cop get some love, there is no Time Crisis on the list, which is just silly.

– Continuing with controversial #hottakes: Lizzy Finnegan of The Escapist has an article, “When the sequel is worse than the original.” Unfortunately, her examples are The Legend of Zelda, Super Mario Bros. and Castlevania, and I’d say that only the latter is actually bad.

– IGN.com’s Cam Shea has a good, longer read on the downfall of the SEGA Rally Championship game series. Warning though, a video autoplays from that link!

– On the Gradius episode, we mentioned that it was seen as Konami’s response to Namco’s classic Xevious. It’s probably for the best that an Atari 2600 port of Xevious never saw the light of day, because the recently unearthed prototype copy is pretty horrible. (Via Kotaku Australia’s Mike Fahey.)

Dragon Warrior 3 - Box ArtON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– Again, it’s a fairly crappy day for video game releases, because it’s the summer. The Game Boy Color version of Dragon Warrior III came out 14 years ago. The original was an incredible RPG that featured multiple classes for the first time in a Dragon Quest / Dragon Warrior game, and even better, you could change at-will once you reached a certain point in the game. However, it originally came out in Japan in 1988, and in June 1991 in North America, and didn’t have much of an impact in the states. On Amazon, GBC prices range from $19.99 (used) to $149.98 (new). Want a boxed copy of the NES edition? It’s only $1,499.95, with used copies starting at $47.95.

– One major studio game released in the summer back in the day: NCAA Football 2004, which came out in 2003 on July 16 for the Playstation 2, Xbox and Gamecube. The cover athlete was Carson Palmer, who is now 35, and the game sells for $1 or less pretty much everywhere in the god damn world.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.