Tag Archives: Namco

Episode 115 – Pac-Man 2: The New Adventures (1994)

Episode 115 – Pac-Man 2: The New Adventures (1994)

Episode 115 – Pac-Man 2: The New Adventures (1994)

This week in Your Parents Basement, we are experiencing the downward spiral of a 1980s star, and helping him get milk for his child! From 1994, we’re playing Pac-Man 2: The New Adventures by Namco for the Super Nintendo and Sega Genesis.

You can manually download this week’s pac-tastic podcast here or subscribe to the show via the iTunes store. To manually subscribe, use this link in the device / podcast player of choice. You can also follow us on Twitter, or ‘like’ us on Facebook.

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TIMESTAMPS

  • 0:00 – Intro, which features the somewhat blasé power pellet theme from this game.
  • 28:30 – Why is this the Most Best Game of All-Time?
  • 31:00 – Emails! Who do you wanna see in a cartoon, or, a gritty realistic show?
  • 48:15 – As always, we help some people in… Ask The Sweet Boys.
  • 55:00 – Snifferoo! Next week’s game comes with a free t-shirt!
  • 57:15 – Blooperoonie! We’re all about callbacks this week.

SHOW NOTES

– According to Price Charting, Pac-Man 2 is very affordable, at $4.99 for the SNES and Genesis carts. It’s $7.50 to $9 if you want the box and manual as well.

– Of course, there is a Pac-Man Wiki. It says the game is based loosely on Pac-Land, an arcade game from 1984, and the Pac-Man animated series from 1982.

Vidya Game News – September 29, 2016

nintendo-64-system-shot

Happy birthday, Nintendo 64!

– GamesIndustry.biz has an awesome, long interview with Rand Miller of Cyan Worlds on Myst, Obduction and releasing a game without a strong publisher. You can read it here, and listen to our show on Myst here!

– Brian Shea at Game Informer has a good piece on how Sega and Nintendo finally made peace over the years, and how Sonic appeared on a Nintendo platform. You can read it here.

– The spiritual successor to River City Ransom, River City: Toyko Rumble, has scooped up a good review from GameSpot. Listen to our show on the original game here.

– The early reviews on Sonic Mania are good so far.

– From The Daily Dot and other sites, the Warcraft movie now has an Honest Trailer out for it. Listen to our review of the game series here!

– PCMag.com has a slideshow on seven Mario games that never made it to the U.S.

ON THIS DAY (OR CLOSE TO IT!) IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– The Nintendo 64 came out for everyone today in 1996. It was kind of a big deal. Past N64 games we’ve covered: Quest 64, Superman 64, Mario Kart 64, Goldeneye and Star Fox 64.

– By the way, it seems weird, but Pokemon Red and Blue came out in Sept. 28, 1998 – two years AFTER the Nintendo 64 was released.

– A little game called Fallout came out for the PC on Sept. 30, 1997. Amazing, a sequel came out only a year later. Both games had more in common with the X-Com series than the action-RPG Fallout has become, but they were very well-reviewed.

Tales of Destiny, the second game in that popular series, came out on Sept. 30, 1998 for the PlayStation. In this game from Namco and Wolf Team, you play as Stahn and kill things with a big sword. It’s a weird kind of RPG-action game, but well-reviewed and well-received.

Crash Team Racing, a completely and utterly original kart racing game, came out on Sept. 30, 1999. For more on Crash Bandicoot, check out our episode from a few weeks ago. And if you’d prefer our thoughts on some other racing game, try this episode.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

 

Vidya Game News – September 22, 2016

mega-man-9-box-art-01– Ohmygodness: A mock 1996 infomercial for the upcoming Sonic Mania Collector’s Edition is incredibleeee.

– From PopSugar and a bunch of other sites, Laurie Hernandez did a routine based on DuckTales on Dancing With The Stars. You can see it here! And check out our episode on DuckTales here!

– Game Rant has an article on the six biggest gaming breakups, in “honor” of Brad and Angelina.

– Nintendo News and other sites note that The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3 is now available on Steam.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

Divine Divinity from Larian Studios came out for the PC in 2002. The action-RPG was well-reviewed when it came out, and it remains a bit of a cult classic.

– On Sept. 23, 2002, Star Fox Adventures was released for the Gamecube. It was the first game to take the series in a weird, non-space sim direction. (And hey, check out our episode on the better, original game and the N64 game!)

– On the same day, Tekken 4 came out. Namco’s fighter was considered very good.

– Capcom’s Mega Man 9 was released for the Wii in 2008, followed shortly by the Playstation Network and Xbox Live Arcade. It was a well-received continuation of the series, the first game in 11 years.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – September 8, 2016

paraside-eve-psx-box-art– So! Nintendo, as usual, has been aggressive pursuing fan games using their characters, with the latest target being a mash-up of Mario and No Man’s Sky. Those developers responded by turning it into DCMA’s Sky. You can read more on Polygon here.

– From The Dreamcast Junkyard, a great series of articles on their hunt to find a legendary barber from some commercials.

– The Couch Potato over at New Castle News has a fine personal essay on his experiences with Super Mario Bros. 3, the Super Nintendo and other gaming stuff. Read it here.

– Reddit and YouTube deliver this week with Midway’s pitch video to the NBA for a little game called NBA Jam. You can check out the video here, and listen to our episode on Jam here!

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– A little deep, story-driven game known as Final Fantasy VII came out for the PlayStation on September 7, 1997. The indie darling sold a ton of copies, and it’s wildly recognized for popularizing RPGs outside of Japan. (And by the way, the PlayStation itself came out on September 9, 1995.)

Parasite Eve, an oft-mentioned favorite of Steve, came out September 9, 1998. It was an odd action RPG with guns that spawned an incredibly underrated sequel, and an iffy PSP game with a completely indecipherable plot.

– Also from 1998: Spyro the Dragon! The little purple dragon started doing like, dragon stuff, on Sept. 10. By Insomniac Games, it was pretty popular with a wide range of gamers, including more casual folks.

– 9/9/99 for $199! The Sega Dreamcast came out on Sept. 9, 1999. God, it was such an awesome little system, but Sega eventually lost its stomach for the console business. It had a strong start that it ceded as hype for the PlayStation 2 ramped up.

Ready 2 Rumble Boxing by Midway came out in 1999 for the Dreamcast, and then later for the N64, PSX and Gameboy Color. The colorful boxing came made people more nostalgic for better boxing games, but it sold well.

– Also for the Dreamcast in 1999: Soulcalibur! The fighter from Namco featured a heavy emphasis on weapons, and it was highly rated at the time and in ensuing years as the series continued.

Final Fantasy Tactics Advance bastardized a great PSX game, but, well, it came out this day in 2003 for the Gameboy Adance. Some people like it. Those people are wrong.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – July 14, 2016

A sweet baby boy NES!

A sweet baby boy NES!

– Pretty much everyone shared this article with Steve on a mini-NES loaded with 30 games. My mini-review: Eh. It’s kind of steep at $59.99, and there’s no indication whether you can load more games on to it. (Note: Nintendo later told Kotaku that no, you can’t.) The HDMI hook-ups are nice, though. However, it feels like a missed opportunity for the Big N. By offering a viable alternative to emulators – like a device that allowed for game downloads, using your old carts and third-party support – they could have taken a nice chunk away from that market.

– A fox takes a Playstation controller from a house and drops it in a garden. Video!

– From Kotaku’s Patrick Klepek, and some other sites, the Saturn’s copy protection has finally been cracked.

– Tech Radar has an interesting list of the most disappointing games of the past 10 years.

– Because Nintendo needs more of your monies, there is now Mario-themed Hot Wheels cars. Read about them on Gaming With Swag.

– Ron Gilbert, the creator Maniac Mansion, talks to Deveop’s James Batchelor about his new game, Thimbleweed Park.

– Anna Pulley, the author of The Lesbian Sex Haiku Book (With Cats!), loves Duck Tales.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

WWF War Zone came out for the Playstation in 1998. Developed by Iguana West and published by Acclaim, it got pretty decent reviews, but tends to be overshadowed by other, better games.

– This was a popular time of year for NCAA Football games to come out, as 2005, 2009 and 2011 editions came out between July 13 and July 15. Unfortunately, the series is now defunct, as EA Sports couldn’t come to an agreement with some NCAA members.

Tales of Symphonia came out for the Gamecube on July 13, 2004. It was later ported to the PS2, and then an expanded version came out for the PS3. Namco is now up to seemingly 700 different Tales games, by the way.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – April 28, 2016

Super Mario Bros. 3 - NES - Box Art– From Ryan Divish and Geoff Baker of The Seattle Times, Nintendo is selling its majority stake in the Seattle Mariners. The valuation is $1.4 billion, and a follow-up story on how the deal was struck is here. The initial purchase price? Around $100 million, according to a January 1992 New York Times article by Lawrence Malkin.

– Kotaku has an excerpt from Alyse Knorr’s book on the making of Super Mario Bros. 3, and it’s an awesome read! Check it out here.

– Now out: Sega 3D Classics Collection, for the Nintendo 3DS. Games include Power Drift, Puyo Puyo 2, Fantasy Zone II and II W, Sonic the Hedgehog, Thunder Blade, Galaxy Force II, Altered Beast and Maze Walker.

– Pretty much every site on the ole Internet had a piece about the new NES adapter that lets you use some modern controllers.

– Nintendo has a Humble Bundle available until May. Highlights include Retro City Rampage and Citizens of Earth.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– Historically, nothing prominent has come out on April 28, so… On April 29, 1998, Tekken 3 came out for the PlayStation. Released by Namco, it’s considered one of the absolute best games for the system, and one of the best fighting games of all-time.

– A little game called Grand Theft Auto IV came out on April 29, 2008. It made a bazillion dollars for Rockstar.

– Similarly: Mario Kart Wii came out in 2008 as well. It was a pretty good day for games.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – February 25, 2016

ET - Game Poster– The BBC has an awesome story and interview with Howard Scott Warshaw, and the headline says it all: “The man who made ‘the worst video game in history.’” And by that, of course they mean E.T. for the Atari 2600. You can read the story here. It gets into some of the troubled development, and also that Atari paid $21 million (!!!) for the rights to the game. (And the awesome image on today’s post comes from that story. They definitely don’t make game ads like they used to.)

– Reddit user dolopodog has posted a list of the banned words for the 3DS.

– This week, the IGN show Nintendo Voice Chat covers the 10 awesome games that never left Japan.

– The co-creator of the Atari Lynx and a programmer for the Amiga, Dave Needle, has passed away, according to a Facebook post.

– From a translation of a YouTube video, Geno of Super Mario RPG was considered as a DLC for Smash Brothers.

– Nathan Birch of Uproxx has a good beginner’s guide on retro gaming and collecting. Of note is that it’s focused on the systems that are the best to collect and play, not necessarily the ones that hold their value the best.

– TechTimes has a link and write-up to one of the old commercials for The Legend of Zelda. It features rapping. It’s ridiculous…ly awesome.

– From JackTech on YouTube, it’s an autopsy of a Game Boy! Also on YouTube, a SNES Counter Console, via Nintendo Enthusiast and Rerez. It was used to test broken systems.

– The Mega Man Legacy Collection came out this week for the 3DS, so there are some reviews of it floating around the Internet, like on Kotaku. There are frame rate issues, just like the original games! Huzzah!

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– Pretty much nothing of significance came out today. Sorry! Tekken 5 came out on Feb. 24, 2005 for the Playstation 2, so that’s about the best I can do.

SHAMELESS PLUGGING

Steve is selling a bunch of video game stuff on eBay; mostly older, cheaper stuff for PS2, XBox, and the 360. Check it out here!

 

Vidya Game News – January 14, 2016

Valkyria Chronicles - Box Art - 01“Please adhere to the following rule of the city square: No swimming, No swearing, No laughing, No crying, No talking out of turn, No line dancing, No moose calling, No sword play, No pumpkin carving, No mummified cat juggling, No wallowing in your own self pity, No circumstantial evidence, No walking on the grass, No pancakes on Monday, No dessert until you eat your vegetables, No slapstick comedy, No balloon animals, And absolutely, positively, No barking like a seal. It upsets me.” – Secret of Evermore.

While following the rules, enjoy this vidya game news.

– Cool old game news, as Natsume has their own eBay store now. This includes new, boxed copies of things like Pocky and Rocky, Lufia II and Harvest Moon. Check it out here.

– Nintendo has joined legions of teenage girls and the year 2007, as they have a Tumblr account now, per Destructoid. Check it out here.

– Also from Destructoid, the fresh screenshots from the PS4 remaster of Valkyria Chronicles!

– From Kotaku ’Stralia and some other sites, a gamer totally broke Secret of Mana the other week during his speedrun. Also, the original game of the series, Final Fantasy Adventure, is getting a re-release on phones and iOS devices, per Polygon’s Allegra Frank.

– Also, publicized on the Mary Sue, NES30 has released a wireless NES controller that works with modern systems. It’s a bit pricey, at $36.99, but pretty damn cool.

– UK site Digital Spy has 11 horrible realities of old school gaming.

– If you live in Barrie, in Central Ontario, congrats! There is a new board game and video game group you can join.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– In 2002, NBA Courtside 2002 was released for the GameCube. As you can imagine from this game being included, it wasn’t a great day for releases, historically…

– The fourth installment of the second .hack series came out in 2004. Quarantine was a weird game, even by Japanese RPG standards. The games go for a pretty penny now, so if you see them, snatch them up.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – July 16, 2015

William Shatner's TekWar - Box Art

Now this looks PRETTY legit.

It’s way too friggin’ humid in New England, but despite the condensation, we’ve prepared only the best news for you to enjoy today! Here are some of the stories about classic games and series we’ve culled from around the Interwebs:

– In last week’s “Four of a Kind” feature on Purple Revolver by James Brookfield, they cover bad celebrity endorsed games. The finalists? Shaq Fu, Chuck Norris Superkicks, Michael Jordan: Chaos in the Windy City, and William Shatner’s TekWar, which apparently exists!

– Looking for some classic game recommendations? Nicholas Bitonti of The Detroit Metro Times has some good recommendations. While I don’t agree with all of them, they’re more obscure and interesting than the usual ones you see floating around the web, and cover a variety of systems.

– For the upcoming release of Pixels, Chauncey Alcorn of The New York Daily News has a ranking of his favorite 10 arcade games of all-time. Spoiler alert: Tekken 4 is way too friggin’ high, and while it’s nice to see Virtua Cop get some love, there is no Time Crisis on the list, which is just silly.

– Continuing with controversial #hottakes: Lizzy Finnegan of The Escapist has an article, “When the sequel is worse than the original.” Unfortunately, her examples are The Legend of Zelda, Super Mario Bros. and Castlevania, and I’d say that only the latter is actually bad.

– IGN.com’s Cam Shea has a good, longer read on the downfall of the SEGA Rally Championship game series. Warning though, a video autoplays from that link!

– On the Gradius episode, we mentioned that it was seen as Konami’s response to Namco’s classic Xevious. It’s probably for the best that an Atari 2600 port of Xevious never saw the light of day, because the recently unearthed prototype copy is pretty horrible. (Via Kotaku Australia’s Mike Fahey.)

Dragon Warrior 3 - Box ArtON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– Again, it’s a fairly crappy day for video game releases, because it’s the summer. The Game Boy Color version of Dragon Warrior III came out 14 years ago. The original was an incredible RPG that featured multiple classes for the first time in a Dragon Quest / Dragon Warrior game, and even better, you could change at-will once you reached a certain point in the game. However, it originally came out in Japan in 1988, and in June 1991 in North America, and didn’t have much of an impact in the states. On Amazon, GBC prices range from $19.99 (used) to $149.98 (new). Want a boxed copy of the NES edition? It’s only $1,499.95, with used copies starting at $47.95.

– One major studio game released in the summer back in the day: NCAA Football 2004, which came out in 2003 on July 16 for the Playstation 2, Xbox and Gamecube. The cover athlete was Carson Palmer, who is now 35, and the game sells for $1 or less pretty much everywhere in the god damn world.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Episode 010 – Gradius (1986) and Gradius 3 (1990)

Episode 010 – Gradius (1986) and Gradius 3 (1990)

Episode 010 – Gradius (1986) and Gradius 3 (1990)

This week in Your Parents Basement, we pew pew pew with our space shootin’ Vic Viper-line ship past flying enemy fighters, sand dragons and giant, pulsating alien hearts. We’re playing the classic side scrolling shooter series Gradius, focusing on its first and third installments, for the NES and SNES respectively.

You can manually download this week’s podcast here, or subscribe to the show via the iTunes store. To manually subscribe, use this link in the device / podcast player of choice. You can also follow us on Twitter, or ‘like’ us on Facebook.

Want to have an email or comment read on the air? We’d love to hear from you! Send us a message on the ole Twitter or Facebook, or, shoot that mail to parentsbasementpodcast@gmail.com. Help us to keep the demons within Scooterbutt at bay.

TIMESTAMPS

  • 0:00 – The intro, which is a Japanese commercial for Gradius 3.
  • 35:00 – The return of the Toddbitskit!
  • 39:15 – Emails. The return of Scooterbutt! Ole Scooty.
  • 54:15 – Snifferoo.

SHOW NOTES

– The 30th anniversary of the Gradius series was this year, and Kurt Kalata had a great article on its development for Gamasutra. You can read it here. He gets into how it developed from an earlier game, Scramble, and served as the Konami answer to Namco’s Xevious.

– The lore and backstory for the Gradius series is really quite superfluously wonderful, considering it’s a game about shootin’ down space alien ships. The Wikipedia article on the series gets into it, and it’s also a good source for the tangled naming web Steve mentions on the show.

– There are many, many, many people who can play Gradius way better than us three schlubs on this show. YouTube has many of their speed run videos, which I recommend checking out because they’re ridiculous.

– Wanna buy Gradius for the NES? Loose carts run from $8 to $13. If you want the box and manual as well, it runs from $17 to $30. For Gradius 3, carts run from $8 to $15. Despite being younger, boxes and manuals are rarer for Gradius 3, and prices run from $37 to $53. Various forms of Gradius are available on current generation systems in their online shops, again in the $8 to $15 range.