Tag Archives: eBay

Episode 045 – Duck Hunt (1985) and World Class Track Meet (1988)

Episode 045 – Duck Hunt (1985) and World Class Track Meet (1988)

Episode 045 – Duck Hunt (1985) and World Class Track Meet (1988)

This week in Your Parents Basement, we are focusing on two pack-in games for the ole NES! From 1985, we’re playing Duck Hunt with the NES Zapper, and from 1988, we’re playing World Class Track Meet, both developed in part by Nintendo.

You can manually download this week’s gimmicky podcast here or subscribe to the show via the iTunes store. To manually subscribe, use this link in the device / podcast player of choice. You can also follow us on Twitter, or ‘like’ us on Facebook.

As always, if you like the show, support us by buying from Amazon! You can use this link to go to Amazon, and any purchase you make will kick a couple bucks to the show, with no extra cost to you. It’s a win-win!

Want to have an email or comment read on the air? Send us a message on the ole Twitter or Facebook, or, shoot that mail to parentsbasementpodcast@gmail.com.

TIMESTAMPS

  • 0:00 – Intro, which features the title theme from World Class Track Meet.
  • 39:00 – Emails! A special friend wants to guest on the show, and the return of a length emailer.
  • 1:06:45 – Snifferoo. Next week, we’re playing a fun, esoteric game that makes Jurassic Park look cheap. (Well, not really. But it’s a fun game with a great soundtrack!)

SHOW NOTES

– According to Price Charting, loose carts of Duck Hunt are super cheap, and only cost $3.35. The same thing goes for the combo packs with Super Mario Bros. and World Class Track Meet. However, the Duck Hunt box adds another $100 on to the price, because it’s so rare. (I can’t remember ever seeing JUST Duck Hunt for sale in a store…) World Class Track Meet seemingly didn’t have a proper release, and it’s not really for sale on eBay as a result.

Stadium Events, the game that World Class Track Meet was repurposed from, goes for an insane amount of money now. GameSpot has a good article on the latest $35,100 auction here.

– From YouTube, modern day teenagers try to play Duck Hunt. Hilarity ensues!

Episode 014 – Contra (1988)

Episode 014 – Shaq Fu (1994)

Episode 014 – Contra (1988)

This week in Your Parents Basement, we are fighting our way through jungles, the tundra and H.R. Giger styled bases to strike at the heart of the alien invasion! That’s right, we’re playing that classic run-and-gun shooter from 1988, Contra! With special guest and Contra virtuoso Backsack! (He got to the ice stage without losing a life!)

You can manually download this week’s wonderful podcast here, or subscribe to the show via the iTunes store. To manually subscribe, use this link in the device / podcast player of choice. You can also follow us on Twitter, or ‘like’ us on Facebook.

As always, if you like the show, support us by buying from Amazon! You can use this link to go to Amazon, and any purchase you make will kick a couple bucks to the show, as no extra cost to you. It’s a win-win!

Want to have an email or comment read on the air? Send us a message on the ole Twitter or Facebook, or, shoot that mail to parentsbasementpodcast@gmail.com.

TIMESTAMPS

  • 0:00 – The intro, which features music from video game music cover band The Minibosses.
  • 44:15 – Emails. The gang talks guilty playshures games.
  • 1:02:00 – Snifferoo.

SHOW NOTES

– As mentioned in the timestamps, the main theme this week is by video game music cover band The Minibosses. Besides Contra, they do a lot of other cool tunes that you should check out. The sound effects from Contra were gotten from this nifty site.

– Amazingly, some people can play Contra even better than Backsack! There are various speedruns on YouTube, such as this one in 10:11, which seems to be the world record as of 2012. It tends to be a popular pick for charity gaming sessions and what not.

– The resemblance between the heroes of Contra and 1980s action movie heroes has not gone unnoticed over the years.

– While we spoke briefly about all of the weird post-Contra Contra games out there, we didn’t talk about the cost of the game. It’s actually somewhat pricey on eBay, with the cost ranging from $25 to $40 for just the game itself. The box and the manual ups it to $70. There is a similar price range for the NES sequel Super C. It oddly has not had a re-release on the Xbox or Playstation stores, but it is included on various Konami classic releases for the Nintendo DS and PC.

Clu Clu Land was mentioned several times by Backsack. You can read more about the game on its Wikipedia page. Or, see it in action on YouTube!

– The weird video game simulation series Steve was talking about, GameBiz, can be downloaded here. There are three installments out, but oddly, they each add and subtract good things. The first is the best at single game development. The second adds the ability to train staff (which is very annoying to do) and multiple game development. The third lets you also develop hardware (which takes forever).

Episode 012 – R.C. Pro Am 1 and 2 (1987 and 1992)

R.C. Pro Am 1 and 2 (1987 and 1992)

R.C. Pro Am 1 and 2 (1987 and 1992)

This week in Your Parents Basement, we’re vrooming past wet spots and through oil slicks, as we avoid bombs dropped by planes! R.C. Pro Am 1 from 1987 is the main topic of conversation, along with Nintendo Power’s NES game of 1993 – which was actually released in December 1992 – R.C. Pro Am 2! Also this week, we have ole friend and big fan Pippenz as a guest, and a very special guest toward the end of the sow.

You can manually download this week’s podcast here, or subscribe to the show via the iTunes store. To manually subscribe, use this link in the device / podcast player of choice. You can also follow us on Twitter, or ‘like’ us on Facebook.

As always, if you like the show, support us by buying from Amazon! You can use this link to go to Amazon, and any purchase you make will kick a couple bucks to the show, as no extra cost to you. It’s a win-win!

Want to have an email or comment read on the air? Send us a message on the ole Twitter or Facebook, or, shoot that mail to parentsbasementpodcast@gmail.com.

We’re also looking for a guest for next week’s show, Comix Zone for the Genesis. If you’re interested in joining the recording, send us an email or comment on one of those social media sites.

TIMESTAMPS

  • 0:00 – The intro, which features the main title theme.
  • 32:45 – The YPB boys are joined by a very special guest!
  • 38:15 – Emails. More dark thoughts from Butterscoot, Scooterbutt and Kristina Ricci.
  • 53:30 – Snifferoo.

SHOW NOTES

– As mentioned on the show, R.C. Pro Am is one of 30 games featured on Rare Replay, which is scheduled to release on Aug. 4 for the Xbox One. Other highlights are the Banjo games, Perfect Dark and the Battletoads games. It’s going for $29.99 to preorder on Amazon.

– A perfect play of the 24 base tracks in R.C. Pro Am can be seen on YouTube here. It’s utterly ridiculous.

– When it comes to the sequel, it was covered by the Angry Video Game Nerd in James and Mike Mondays a little while ago. It doesn’t look like anyone has cared enough to upload a proper speedrun to YouTube, but there is a longplay here.

– NES Guide, a good resource for that system, has a list of racing games for the system. This forum post at Atari Age is also useful, since it lumps them into single and multiplayer games. As mentioned on the pod, Excitebike was the first to come out, in October 1985, followed by Mach Rider in August 1986, which was more of a mixture of shooting and arcade racer. Square’s Rad Racer came out in October 1987, which was then followed by R.C. Pro Am in February 1988.

– There is a Genesis version of R.C. Pro Am, and it’s essentially an enhancement of the original. Records are saved and what not, which helps too, I’m sure. However, it came out in 1992, when the racing scene was crowded with other, better games.

– On Amazon, the first game is around $10, but the second goes for a premium – between $65 and $100. eBay is a bit more reasonable on the first, with $3 to $10 for just the cart, and $18 to $25 if you want the box and manual. The second game still goes for $35 to $100, for just the cart, and the only box and manual and cart combo is $213.74. The Genesis version is $5 to $10, even with the box and manual.

Episode 011 – Secret of Mana (1993)

Secret of Mana (1993)

Secret of Mana (1993)

This week in Your Parents Basement, we are playing one of the highest-rated RPGs of the 16-bit era, Square’s Secret of Mana! Follow along as we lavish praise on the fighting system and music, and do our best to overlook the truncated dialogue in the fight against ebbing mana.

You can manually download this week’s podcast here, or subscribe to the show via the iTunes store. To manually subscribe, use this link in the device / podcast player of choice. You can also follow us on Twitter, or ‘like’ us on Facebook.

Like the show? Support us by shopping on Amazon then! It doesn’t cost you any extra money, and it puts some cash in our pockets. Click here for more info.

Want to have an email or comment read on the air? We’d love to hear from you! Send us a message on the ole Twitter or Facebook, or, shoot that mail to parentsbasementpodcast@gmail.com. We’re also looking for future show guests, and future show ideas! You can leave those in comments here, or on Facebook or Twitter.

TIMESTAMPS

  • 0:00 – The intro, which features music from the flying portions of the game.
  • 47:40 – Emails. More dark thoughts from Butterscoot.
  • 54:00 – Snifferoo.

SHOW NOTES

– We don’t get into heavy story spoilers for Secret of Mana, since the iOS and Droid versions are still good, and thus, hopefully some of you will be interested enough to give it a try. Basically, any story aspect we talk about comes up within the first five hours (about 10 percent) of the game. However, it should be said that at one point, you do get to save Santa.

– We somewhat on the development history of this game, which is pretty interesting and has been written about several times. In addition to the always-reliable Wikipedia, 1-Up has a column about how the series actually began in 1987.

– As far as the translation specifically, Wikipedia has a transcript of a September 1994 interview with Ted Woolsey, the poor bastard who had to do all of Secret of Mana in 30 days. In the 1990s, he was a controversial figure because his translations really morphed the intent of some text and plot, but opinion has softened on him over the years as people have become aware of the programming and time limitations he faced. He did the translation work on Mana, Final Fantasy 3, Breath of Fire and Chrono Trigger. He has his own page on TV Tropes, Woolseyism, and now works for Microsoft.

– On the show, I (Steve) said that I thought I could probably work my way through this game in 10 hours or so. Well, on YouTube, there is a speed run done in about 3 hours. Ye gads.

– Also on the show, as usual, we talk about how much the game costs now. As mentioned several times, the iOS version is well-reviewed, removes some translation errors and only costs about $10. On eBay, loose carts go for about $30 to $70, and complete packages (game, box, map and manual) go for around $100 to $200, depending on condition. There are also tons of Secret of Mana 2 carts on eBay in the $45 to $60 range. These are not official though; they’re simply the fan translation dumped on to a cart. They’re still playable on your SNES, though.

– We talk briefly about Secret of Evermore, which plays a bit like Mana, but is otherwise completely unrelated. We might cover it more in-depth on another show. Via the Internet Archive Wayback Machine, Super-NES.com has a great interview with Brian Fehdrau, the lead programmer for Evermore.

– Hat tip to co-host Todd Brisket, who found this story about the newest boss additions to the Japanese-only Vita game, Rise of Mana.

Episode 004: Vectorman (1995)

Episode 004: Vectorman (1995)

Episode 004: Vectorman (1995)

Genesis does what Nintendont! Vectorman is hellishly hard, but it’s fun to turn from balls into a bomb and to explooodddeeee!

On today’s show, Steve, Todd and Huell are joined by their (non-British) friend Pip to talk about how impossible this game is, unless you’re using the Game Genie. (Yes, even save states aren’t enough to overcome Vectorman!) There is also talk of Genesis vs. Super Nintendo, and Vectorman vs. Donkey Kong Country. And of course, balls and Ballz.

To listen, click here! You can subscribe to future shows in the iTunes store – be sure to give us some starrrsss! – or by manually using this address: https://ypbpodcast.com/category/podcasts/feed/

Be sure to listen to the Snifferoo at the end, and if you’re interested in guesting on the show this week, send us an email at parentsbasementpodcast@gmail.com. You can also follow us on Twitter, or Facebook.

Show notes for this episode:

  • Vectorman can be purchased on Steam for $2.99, or as part of larger Sega classics packages for $7.50 or $29.99. Hard copies on eBay are going for about $5 to $10, and unlike some other games we’ve covered, the inclusion of the box and manual only ups the price range to $15 to $25. Vectorman 2 is in a similar price range.
  • The Snifferoo from last week was the main theme from Vectorman, which can be listened to on YouTube here. The commercial that provides the opening music for this week’s ‘sode is here.
  • Balls? No, Ballz!

Episode 003: DuckTales (1989)

Episode 003: DuckTales (1989)

Episode 003: DuckTales (1989)

In Duckburg, life is like a hurricane – race cars, lasers, airplanes, it’s a duck-blur! You might solve a mystery, or re-write history. DuckTales! woohoo!

That fine hamlet of Duckburg is the subject of this week’s Your Parents Basement, as our third episode tackles 1989’s DuckTales for the NES. You can listen to the show by clicking here.

Like what you hear? You can subscribe to future episodes via the iTunes Store, or manually add this to your podcast listenin’ device: https://ypbpodcast.com/category/podcasts/feed/

We are absolutely looking for guests and ideas for future shows! For both, please email them to us – parentsbasementpodcast@gmail.com – as opposed to leaving them as comments. You can also follow us on Twitter.

Show notes for this episode:

  • Jessica Nigri is the cosplayer that was the visual inspiration for Lollipop Chainsaw. OneeChanbara, the other chainsaw character mentioned by Todd, is barely able to link to. Here is the Wikipedia entry, because anywhere else you look on the web is pretty much NSFW.
  • The snifferoo from last week comes from this YouTube video, which is the memorable Moon Stage theme. The remastered version is also quite good. The main NES theme can be heard here.
  • Someone beating DuckTales in about nine minutes can be seen here. A more leisurely 30+ minute play is here.
  • Want to buy DuckTales? The remastered version is your best bet, with hard copies in the $15 to $20 range, and digital copies ranging from $5 to $15, depending on whether there is a sale or not. As Todd mentioned on the pod, it’s currently on sale on Steam for $7.50, through Tuesday.
  • The NES cart ranges from $5 to $20 on eBay, depending on what condition you want it in. And as with most NES games, you can up the price to around $40 to $60 if you want the box and manual.
  • As mentioned on the show, DuckTales 2 for the NES is hard to find. A complete package of the box, manual and cart are going for $400. The cart by itself is in the $150 to $200 range. Just the manual is selling for $138. There don’t seem to be any plans in the works to give it a remaster or port treatment.
  • An explanation of how DuckTales came to be remastered is on this message board.