Category Archives: Game Boy Color

Episode 247 – Pokemon Gold and Pokemon Silver (2000)

Episode 247 – Pokemon Gold and Pokemon Silver (2000)

Episode 247 – Pokemon Gold and Pokemon Silver (2000)

This week in Your Parents Basement, we are AGAIN catching them all. From 2000, we’re playing Pokemon Gold and Pokemon Silver, developed by Game Freak and published by Nintendo for the Game Boy and Game Boy Color! Huell isn’t here, but we’re joined by Steve’s old reporting buddy Jake!

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TIMESTAMPS

  • 0:00 – Intro, which features a jaunty tune from the pokemons!
  • 30:30 – Todd has reasons why this is… The Most Best Game of All-Time! Followed by our regular, fun features, like Herzogs and DuckTales.
  • 48:30 – Emails!
  • 1:00:45 – Snifferoo. Next week, we’re embracing a new language and a new way of life.

Vidya Game News – October 13, 2016

socks-the-cat-01– Biggest news EVER possibly: The Socks the Cat game for the SNES is probably going to get a release, once it hits its Kickstarter goal! Yay! Read more here. Second Dimension and Tom Curtin, a gaming historian and collector, managed to secure the rights.

– On Kotaku, they have a news item on an NES replica that’s in the shape of a Zelda chest. And, oh, by the way, it has a wireless, floating Tri-force. Read more here!

– Stuff has a cool feature on the history of Nintendo handhelds, including the Game and Watch.

ON THIS DAY (OR CLOSE TO IT!) IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

Mortal Kombat 3 was released for the Genesis and Super Nintendo today in 1995, after its release in arcades on April 15. Its story is completely insane, but hey, it has more buckets of blood, like the previous games in the series.

Pokemon Gold and Silver came out on October 15, 2000. They sold a billion copies.

WWF Raw was released for the PC on October 14, 2002. Because it was the last WWF game on the PC until 2015, it was a popular when it came to mods, even though Anchor’s effort received middling reviews when it came out.

Shin Megami Tensei: Nocturne was released October 12, 2004. It was the first game of that series released in the U.S. by Atlus, and it immediately became a cult classic, bought by about 20 people who all happened to be game critics.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – July 28, 2016

Mario Golf - Toadstool Tour - GCN - Box Art– Nintendo is mining its past heavily for the Christmas season, as in addition to the NES Classic Edition, they also plan to come out with the Playing With Power: Nintendo NES Classics retrospective book on 17 games. Read more on the Prima Games site here.

– Hey, Sega also licensed their systems for new productions years ago! Except, according to Polygon, they kind of suck.

– From Geek, the Retroist has a fun feature on misleading Atari 2600 box art.

– Surprisingly, the new Ghostbusters game is just as bad as the old one, according to Brett Makedonski of Destructoid.

– On IGN and a bunch of other sites, a wireless receiver is now available to use PS4 and other current gen controllers on the SNES.

– Jason Schreier of Kotaku has a good retrospective on Final Fantasy III for the NES.

– Surprisingly, Honest Game Trailers tackles the awful Superman 64 this week.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour came out in 2003 for the Gamecube. It was the second game in the Mario Golf series and well-received during its release.

Pokemon Crystal came out on July 29, 2001 for the Game Boy Color. Seemingly, Nintendo is the only company releasing good games in the dog days of summer…

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – November 19, 2015

Gauntlet Atari 2600 - Box Art - 01“It’s dangerous to go alone! Take this.” ­– The Legend of Zelda.

– A cool project by a programmer dude is detailed on AtariAge, as he modified Dark Chambers into a version of Gauntlet that works on the Atarti 2600! Read about his work here.

– Confirming earlier trademark and copyright work, this week Sega confirmed that they are making a new Valkyria Chronicles for the Playstation 4, and remastering the old games as well. Sega Nerds had a translation of the Famitsu article. The third game never made it to the U.S., so it’s unclear if the new game or the remastered games will either.

– Two big Nintendo items this week. There will be a female Link, Linkle, in 3DS game Hyrule Warriors, per Twitter. Also, per almost every site on the Internet, the original Pokémon games will be getting re-releases.

– Neat advertising stuff, as Gamezone has an article by Samantha Bishop on the cool, old Kay Bee Toys flyers that got posted on Flickr. And from Tech2, they have the six worst gaming ads of all-time.

– Robyn Miller, the composer of Myst, has signed on to provide the music for Obduction. It’s a new graphical adventure that is clearly influenced by Myst.

– Cool Kickstarter project: an illustrated history of game controllers from 1972 to 1989. Check out the project from Player One Books here.

– Very important business from The Chicago Sun-Times, as Chicago Bulls player Tony Snell claims to have loved playing as Michael Jordan in NBA Jam. Say what? Everyone knows Jordan wasn’t in the game! He is probably confusing it with NBA Live 2000, which was the first basketball game in ages to actually have Jordan.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– In 2000, Banjo-Tooie came out. The sequel to Banjo-Kazooie, it was also well-reviewed. The platformer was the second-to-last game that Rare did for Nintendo, before becoming a developer for Microsoft.

Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic was released for the PC in 2003, a few months after its initial release on the Xbox. It was an excellent RPG developed by BioWare.

– Not quittteee this day, but on Nov. 18, 1998, the Game Boy Color came out. It’s a popular day for Nintendo releases, because the Wii came out on this day in 2006.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – October 15, 2015

Tetris - Box ArtThis week’s news is from Russia with FUN!

– Some guy named Steve Colebert had the Zelda orchestra on. You’ve probably heard about it already, but if not, it’s totally on Youtube.

– From Kotaku, Brian Ashcraft has a re-post of a popular old post that has a tour of Nintendo’s original headquarters in Japan.

– A hardcore Japanese gamer has kept his SNES on for 20 years because he’s worried that his save game data for obscure game Umihara Kawase might be at-risk. Preston Phro of Rocket News 24 has a good write-up here.

– If you’re in the Portland, Oregon area, then you still have time to check out the annual Classic Tetris World Championship! It takes place this weekend, Oct. 17 and Oct. 18, at their own yearly Portland Retro Gaming Expo. There are prizes ranging from $125 to $1,000 for top-four finishes.

– Uproxx and plenty of other sites had this item on someone mashing up Kendrick Lamar and Super Mario Bros.

– Per the official Natsume Twitter account and some other sources on the Internets, Nintendo is moving on from re-releasing older games (SNES, Game Boy, NES) on the Virtual Console. Along similar lines, hackers discovered a list of about 70 future online releases by Nintendo.

– Gamasutra’s Christian Nutt has a really good Q&A with producers who have worked with Nintendo before about the process of creating games in conjunction with the company.

– CinemaBlend has a write-up of a nifty YouTube video that re-imagines Star Wars Battlefront as a SNES game, Super Star Wars Battlefront.

– WHO’S A GOOD DOG? Atari is a good dog, and he’s available for adoption!

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

Pokémon Gold and Pokémon Silver came out 15 years ago for the Game Boy Color. These were the first proper, full sequels to the original blue and red installments, and solidified Pokémon as a phenomenon.

Wild Arms 3 came out in 2002 for the Playstation 2. It’s a niche RPG series with a sort of Western feel and theme, and worth checking, especially the later games that iron out some of the kinks of the first installment.

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring was released 13 years ago for the Playstation 2. While it received mediocre to bad reviews, this was still way better than the SNES installment that was a past YPB game.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – August 13, 2015

Pokemon Snap - Box ArtAh, August 13. At least it’s not a Friday the 13th, the day of OK movies and horrible games, historically. Looking at this week’s neat vidya game stories from around the web:

– Polygon is doing the lord’s work by ranking all 30 games in the Rare Replay classic remake for the Xbox One. You can read it here, but as a warning, it’s an intense load in terms of video and flash for some older machines. The piece is by Philip Kollar.

– In Vancouver, a dude has souped up his Hyundai with a Sega Genesis theme, according to an article in the Parksville Qualicum Beach News.

– From Cinema Blend, an article by William Usher on the weird and terrifying Sonic games.

– The latest Kids React video is on the Nintendo 64’s Pokemon Snap. It’s like Kids Say The Darnedest Things, without roofie pudding pops!

– Cameron Faulkner of Tech Radar points out that a line can be drawn from the development of the Dreamcast to the eventual integration of Windows 10 into the Xbox.

– Ever wondered about the video game industry in Ireland? News Talk has you covered.

– The movie version of DuckTales, The Treasure of the Lost Lamp, turned 25 in August.

– From Kotaku, the secret NES and SNES games on Seinfeld’s bookshelf.

Xena Warrior Princess - Box ArtON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

Xena: Warrior Princess came out for the Game Boy Color in 2001, as did World Series Baseball 2K2 for the Dreamcast. As you can imagine, August is still slim pickings for decent video game releases. The next year, NCAA College Football 2K3 came out.

– In 2003, EA Montreal was announced. It formally opened in March 2004. They’ve mostly produced accessory and spin-off games for EA, excluding NHL 07 and Army of Two.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – July 23, 2015

The original box art for the Sega CD version of Night Trap.

The original box art for the Sega CD version of Night Trap.

Man, July is almost over! Where does the time go? Quicker than the final quarter in a game of NBA Jam! Anyway, here is this week’s news post:

– Dave Voyles is a sturdier man than most, since he’s taken on the technical challenge of turning the infamous Night Trap into a playable online game. For more information, check out his post on Gamasutra.

– There is an awesome new documentary project on Kickstarter, called Insert Coin: Inside Midway’s 90s Revolution. If the project hits its goal of $75,000, it plans to cover all the games of the era: Smash TV, NARC, WrestleMania, and of course, NBA Jam and Mortal Kombat.

– On past episodes, Steve has mentioned how much he liked the book Console Wars by Blake J. Harris, which really covers the rise and fall of Sega. The Mary Sue’s Dan Van Winkle has an interview with Harris here. (And hey, if you want to buy the book, don’t forget about our Amazon link!)

– From Chris Arrant of Newsarama, details on the deal between Atari and Dynamite to publish items on the gaming company’s deep back inventory of items.

– The latest effort from Honest Trailers? The Super Mario Bros. movie!

– A United Kingdom company is now offering retro game mural wallpaper.

– Via Riley Little of Game Rant, a dad has turned his child’s nursery into one with a Mario Kart 8 theme.

– Business Insider has an unwrapping of the new $500 Nintendo Entertainment System. (Warning: Video will autoplay!)

– David Nield of Motoring Research has a list of the best retro tech of the 1990s, which includes the Super Nintendo and the Game Boy Color, amongst other devices like beepers, point and shoot cameras, and Nokia phones.

Box art for Max Payne.

Box art for Max Payne.

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– In 2001, Max Payne came out for the PC. According to Wikipedia, the three games in the series have now sold more than 7.5 million copies. It was known for introducing Matrix-style “bullet time” to games.

– And since it’s July, almost nothing else came out. Womp womp womp.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – July 16, 2015

William Shatner's TekWar - Box Art

Now this looks PRETTY legit.

It’s way too friggin’ humid in New England, but despite the condensation, we’ve prepared only the best news for you to enjoy today! Here are some of the stories about classic games and series we’ve culled from around the Interwebs:

– In last week’s “Four of a Kind” feature on Purple Revolver by James Brookfield, they cover bad celebrity endorsed games. The finalists? Shaq Fu, Chuck Norris Superkicks, Michael Jordan: Chaos in the Windy City, and William Shatner’s TekWar, which apparently exists!

– Looking for some classic game recommendations? Nicholas Bitonti of The Detroit Metro Times has some good recommendations. While I don’t agree with all of them, they’re more obscure and interesting than the usual ones you see floating around the web, and cover a variety of systems.

– For the upcoming release of Pixels, Chauncey Alcorn of The New York Daily News has a ranking of his favorite 10 arcade games of all-time. Spoiler alert: Tekken 4 is way too friggin’ high, and while it’s nice to see Virtua Cop get some love, there is no Time Crisis on the list, which is just silly.

– Continuing with controversial #hottakes: Lizzy Finnegan of The Escapist has an article, “When the sequel is worse than the original.” Unfortunately, her examples are The Legend of Zelda, Super Mario Bros. and Castlevania, and I’d say that only the latter is actually bad.

– IGN.com’s Cam Shea has a good, longer read on the downfall of the SEGA Rally Championship game series. Warning though, a video autoplays from that link!

– On the Gradius episode, we mentioned that it was seen as Konami’s response to Namco’s classic Xevious. It’s probably for the best that an Atari 2600 port of Xevious never saw the light of day, because the recently unearthed prototype copy is pretty horrible. (Via Kotaku Australia’s Mike Fahey.)

Dragon Warrior 3 - Box ArtON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– Again, it’s a fairly crappy day for video game releases, because it’s the summer. The Game Boy Color version of Dragon Warrior III came out 14 years ago. The original was an incredible RPG that featured multiple classes for the first time in a Dragon Quest / Dragon Warrior game, and even better, you could change at-will once you reached a certain point in the game. However, it originally came out in Japan in 1988, and in June 1991 in North America, and didn’t have much of an impact in the states. On Amazon, GBC prices range from $19.99 (used) to $149.98 (new). Want a boxed copy of the NES edition? It’s only $1,499.95, with used copies starting at $47.95.

– One major studio game released in the summer back in the day: NCAA Football 2004, which came out in 2003 on July 16 for the Playstation 2, Xbox and Gamecube. The cover athlete was Carson Palmer, who is now 35, and the game sells for $1 or less pretty much everywhere in the god damn world.

Video game history information comes from GameFAQs and Moby Games. And as always, if you’d like to support the show, do so via our Amazon link.

Vidya Game News – June 26, 2015

I remember where I was that fateful day.

I remember where I was that fateful day.

It’s the last week of June! By this time next week, we’ll be close to celebrating America’s birthday. Because freedom. And Merrica. And burgers and hot dogs and good times.

– As reported by pretty much every blog about vidya games on the Internet, GameStop now has a classic games section. For the most part, their prices seem on par with eBay and Amazon, so feel free to scoop up some games the next time you get a gift card from a relative. The “PowerUp Rewards” discount does apply, and you do get points for buying used games.

– Andrew Schartmann at Slate has a cool article on how Koji Kondo composed the first true video game score, the “Game Over” theme from Super Mario Bros.

– Some people like to mod their NES with skins. Here is one with an apocalyptic theme.

– On Digg, the very first Japanese commercial for Super Mario Bros. (Speaking of Mario’s creator, he’s interested in designing theme parks.)

– And on MTV.com, they have nine things you can throw away after graduating college, instead of keeping in your parents basement. (They’re totally wrong on that Bluto from Animal House poster though, that’s gonna be a babe magnet.)

ON THIS DAY IN VIDEO GAME HISTORY…

– In 2000, Kirby 64 and Crystalis for Game Boy Color were released. The latter is a cool cult classic that originally came out for the NES in July 1990. Unfortunately, the GBC version is a bit inferior overall, changing some elements of the game, but it or the original are still worth hunting down and playing in some sort. The game also somewhat famously predicted that the Earth’s axis would shift and cause mutations in 1997, which we’re a little bit past at this time…

Astrotit came out in 1987 for the PC computer. I never played it, and apparently, it’s a topdown arcade adult shooter. And it has a silly name.